What’s Next in the Aesthetics Industry

limelight

Even if you already work in the industry or are considering a career in it, the Aesthetics industry is a hard one to keep up with. There are new developments, discoveries and products on the market every day. Here are just a few that you might not have heard of yet, but are sure to become more mainstream in the months/years to come.

Aesthetic Apps

These days, there’s an App for everything and with technology playing such a huge role in this industry, it was only a matter of time before an App was developed for the aesthetics industry. These Apps will allow you to see what you will look like after a particular treatment. So, if you are not sure if you want, for example, lip fillers, you can simply download the App, upload a photo, choose which treatment you are considering, and see what you think of the results. Whether this will take off on your personal phone or just be used by beauty spas and clinics is yet to be seen. While this is not commonplace in the market yet, watch this space.

Augmented Reality

Following on with the App theme, there is also an App where a woman wearing a uniquely designed “bra” is videoed, and the App superimposes augmented breasts over the top of the bra so the woman can see what she’d look like with a particular shape or size of breasts. It’s said to be like a virtual mirror where you can shop for the exact breasts you want so when you have the surgery you are clearer on what the results are going to look like. There are already similar, less advanced versions of this being used in surgeon’s offices around the world but this takes it to the next step.

Regrowing Hair

Hair loss and its treatment has certainly gone from strength to strength in the last decade or two. There have been special creams and formulas, hair transplants etc and they all work to a certain extent, but with all the research and discoveries on cell growth and stimulation to make us more beautiful, the golden ticket to solve the problem once and for all is hair follicles to regenerate and start growing hair again. There are science labs who have managed to do this in a laboratory, but as of yet it’s still not at a stage where it has worked on a human. With so many men (and women!) dealing with loss of hair, whether it be partial or complete baldness in their lifetime, this is one area where research is definitely getting quality time.

Will We Finally Get Rid of Cellulite?

There are already some newer devices on the market claiming they can help reduce cellulite but for some reason this stubborn condition is one of the hardest to treat. There’s been reasonable success with creams, liposuction, massage and mesotherapy, yet none have so far managed to produce results so outstanding as to warrant a breakthrough in the treatment of cellulite. LED’s, laser and most recently Coolsculpting have been said to help, but even these new treatments have been unable to produce perfect results. However, as non-surgical body contouring and aesthetic product development continues to move forward at a bold pace, it may only be a matter of time before cellulite can be treated with brilliant results in just a trip to the beauty salon.

 

Main Image Source: Face Plus Medispa

The Psychology Behind Aesthetics

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When thinking of aesthetics or anything to do with the beauty industry, one may not automatically associate it with psychology, or the study of the mind.  Yet, there is a very important link between the two and for those seeking to follow a career in aesthetics, it’s important to understand the link between physiology and psychology, and why patients may seek treatment.

The Proven Link Between Stress and Pimples!

Most of us know that if we’re stressed we quite often get a pimple, or a cold sore, or perhaps even hives or a rash of some sort.  There is a proven link between psychological trauma and anxiety manifesting into physical ailments.  The level of stress the patient is under can quite often influence the level of physical expression of the disease or ailment.  There’s also the opposite effect; physical appearance can affect one’s state of mind, behaviour and way of life (someone with terrible acne may become extremely shy and less social than someone who has never been affected etc.).

The environment, surrounding society and culture can also serve as a major factor in one’s motivations or desires for appearance expectations and associated cosmetic modifications.  These factors can also provide an insight into a patient’s self image or body image and in extreme cases, body dysmorphic disorder (BDD).

There are many elements that need to be considered when it comes to understanding different patients, and their choices and behaviours.  Some of these include:

  • Sex or gender identification
  • Age
  • Home environment – do they have kids, elderly parents to care for?
  • Culture, background
  • Surrounding Society
  • Socio-economic status
  • Body image

A Step Ahead of the Rest

The majority of clients seeking beauty or cosmetic treatments are doing so in order to make themselves feel better about their appearance; there is emotion behind the motivation.  Whether it’s stress, anxiety, societal pressure, career insecurities, physical; identifying these underlying emotions may give you an advantage over other practitioners, if you understand the patient and their motivations for seeking treatment.  It can also be a great tool to knowing which treatment will suit the client or what result will satisfy their needs.  Building a good relationship with your patients or clients is paramount to ensure return business and satisfied customers, as providing an all inclusive approach to the consumer’s well-being is expected in today’s world.

When Things Go Wrong

It’s also important to be able to counsel your clients if their results are unexpected, not what they think they asked for, or they have an adverse physiological reaction.  Understanding someone’s deeper motivations and psyche for any type of cosmetic treatment or enhancement will allow you to deal with any fall outs or unexpected results.

It is also important to be able to identify when a potential client might NOT be suitable for cosmetic treatments.  Someone with BDD may be obsessed and not psychologically sound to make choices when it comes to having more treatments done, and it’s important to be able to advise these patients accordingly.
Being aware of the underlying factors for a client and how this impacts their decision to seek assistance will empower aesthetic technicians and dermal clinicians to provide more comprehensive treatment options and deliver desirable results.

 

Image Source: Esteem Medi Spa

Good Aesthetician Practices

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In an industry where everything from hygiene, education, appearances and personal care matters, there are tell-tale signs of a good aesthetician. For a client who is looking for the ‘right’ aesthetician, there are certain elements which will determine who they end up trusting, not only with their skin, but also their health and wellbeing.

Today we look at good aesthetician practices which should be adhered to at all times.

Thorough knowledge

A good aesthetician should, first and foremost, have a complete and thorough knowledge of both human biology and up-to-date industry procedures and treatments. One ought to be able to assess a client’s concerns and prescribe a treatment plan according to the individual – especially if there are certain contraindications, such as sensitivity, eczema, rosacea or acne.

Education is vital for an aesthetician to deliver the best treatments and results for their clients. Having a firm foundation in the human anatomy and aesthetic procedures is a must, but continuing one’s education is just as important.

Asking questions

Being able to properly diagnose a client’s concerns is the only way to develop an effective treatment plan. One can’t expect to formulate an accurate diagnosis without probing and asking a client the right questions. While assessing the skin might let you know that the person most likely has acne, it’s only through talking to them and digging deeper that you might discover that they actually have Papulopustular Rosacea. Here are some questions you might ask a client:

+ What are your main skin concerns?
+ Is today a good, bad or normal skin day for you?
+ What kind of acne do you normally get (cysts, little bumps, pustules, etc)?
+ When do you find your skin is the most sensitive?
+ When did this symptom develop?
+ Is your skincare regime simple or include a lot of products? What products are in your regime?

Your qualifications matter

Receiving a qualification, be it a certificate, diploma or degree, is important in cementing your knowledge in the field. However, it should not be hidden away. Having your qualifications on display also lets your clients – and future clients – know that that you are certified and able to practice. This is another reason to continually look for further education opportunities and update your skills.

Cause minimal irritation

A good aesthetician should always look for the least invasive and irritating option for their client. Needless aggravating procedures will only upset the skin and may lead to more issues down the road. One ought to be able to assess every case individually and prescribe the most effective treatment with short and long term results in mind.

 

Main Image Source: Renee Rouleau Skin Care